Monday, December 19, 2011

 

Drone Pilots Experiencing Exaustion-Stress-Fatigue

Why overworked drone pilots are falling victims to stress

Daily Mail
By Jill Reilly Controlling a drone aircraft over Afghanistan from the safety of a military base in the United States is much more stressful than first thought, according to a new study. Although the drone pilots do not have to deal with overseas ...

Report: High Levels Of 'Burnout' In US Drone Pilots

NPR
by Rachel Martin Drone pilots fight a war from the safety of bases in the US but confront some of the same wartime stresses as their comrades on the battlefield. Drone pilots fight a war from the safety of bases in the US but confront some of the same ...

Air Force Drone Operators Report High Levels of Stress

New York Times
The Air Force has long known anecdotally of the job pressures on drone pilots, who use joysticks and computer screens to fly their aircraft, most typically over Afghanistan, from bases in the United States. But the study, conducted by the Air Force ...

Overstretched US drone pilots face stress risk

Reuters Africa
America's insatiable demand for drone technology is taking a heavy toll on Air Force crews, with just under a third of active duty pilots of drones like the Predator reporting symptoms of burnout and 17 percent showing signs of "clinical distress. ...

US drone operators show signs of exhaustion

USA Today
About a third of drone pilots, camera operators and mission coordinators work 50 to 60 hours per week or more, data show. Many change shifts every 30 days. Burnout in this group was found among one in three, the research shows. Lt. Gen. ...

Drone pilots face exhaustion, Air Force responds

FederalNewsRadio.com
You might not think about it this way, but the people who operate the drones are showing signs of exhaustion. USA Today reports that the airmen in charge of the Predators, Reapers and Global Hawks are complaining of increasing workloads, shift changes ...

Stress strikes drone operators

Tbo.com
The Air Force has known of job pressures on drone pilots, who use joysticks and computer screens to fly drones, most typically over Afghanistan, from US bases. The study by the Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, ...

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